moroccan carrot soup

December 13, 2010

There is comforting soup and then there’s comforting soup. Take a look at what my world looked like the day I made this:

That’s me, up to my thighs in snow. We had the worst snow storm in twenty years this weekend. That, evidently, is what I signed up for when I moved to Minnesota.

It was pretty nuts. Dan and I went out for a walk and came across so many neighbours stuck in the snow as they tried to drive or move their cars for the impending snow emergency parking restrictions. Impossible.

14 inches of snow and snow drifts several feet high…crazy, I tell you! Dan and I tried to get out ourselves for a party we really wanted to go to and spent an hour trying to get out of our driveway…and back in. Not happening.

So, when I go on about how winter in Minnesota demands soup, maybe you’ll understand it a little better now. I tell you what, growing up in England did not prepare me for this! We came in from the snow, defrosted a little and then I made this soup.

Moroccan cuisine intrigues me massively. The flavours in this soup are just immense.  I’ve never had anything quite like it and certainly never made anything like it. Rice in soup we all know about, but milk? Egg yolks? Mint? Try it. I promise, it might blow your mind.

I take zero credit for this soup by the way- I was wading in unknown territory here and followed Allegra McEvedy’s recipe down to the last sprinkling of paprika.

It’s creamy (milk, egg yolks, rice) and the toasted cumin and mint are such an amazing combination, I can barely describe it. I will say this, don’t leave out anything – all the flavours in this soup combine perfectly to give it the unique taste it has. The cumin and mint are absolutely essential.

Moroccan Carrot Soup

adapted from The Guardian

Ingredients

  • 1/2 tbsp cumin seeds
  • 6 large carrots
  • 2 tbsp butter
  • 1/2 cup rice
  • 1 cup plus 2/3 tbsp milk
  • 5 cups chicken or veg stock
  • 2 egg yolks
  • small handful of mint, chopped
  • sprinkling of paprika

Directions

1. Toast the cumin seeds in a dry pan until you can smell their flavour, then crush with the side of a knife.

2. Wash and roughly chop the carrots into 3cm chunks, then sweat them on a medium heat in the butter for 10-15 minutes.

3. Cook the rice in boiling salted water for 12 minutes or until ready, then drain.

4. Once the carrots are beginning to go golden, cover with the milk and stock, bring to the boil and simmer until tender. This will take about 10 minutes.

5. Blend the soup to a rough consistency, then tip back into the pan and add the rice and cumin. Simmer for a few more minutes.

6. Pull off the heat, whisk in the yolks one by one, stir in the chopped mint, season well and serve immediately with a sprinkle of paprika.

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{ 13 comments… read them below or add one }

Erica December 13, 2010 at 9:35 am

oh my snow! Stay warm over there. This soup looks like the perfect way to heat up. I love carrot soup, I need to make some again soon

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Holly December 13, 2010 at 9:59 am

this looks absolutely UH-MAY-ZING! seriously. i want some now.

now i suddenly feel bad about biatching about the amount of snow we got seeing your snow drift as well as the fact that the METRODOME COLLAPSED!!! buh bye vikings. anyways, have a very happy Monday love :)

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Whitney December 13, 2010 at 10:21 am

that is some beautiful soup!

Chicago just got lots of blowing snow and not much accumulation and now its just flat out COLD.

Brrzzess.

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Rhona @RedWineRunner December 13, 2010 at 3:15 pm

Gosh that looks so tasty, I love Moroccan food! Definately one to try over the Christmas holidays. I’m not too sure about putting the egg yolks in it though…

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Angharad December 13, 2010 at 10:57 pm

Thanks for all the great comments everyone!
Rhona – the egg yolks really thicken up the soup and add great texture. They cook as you add them too so they shouldn’t be anything to worry about.

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rebecca December 13, 2010 at 3:30 pm

oh my that snow is crazy u poor thing, but you make amazing food he he love ya just put up guest post

Rebecca

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Emily Z December 13, 2010 at 6:16 pm

Hi there, I saw your guest post on Rebecca’s blog and thought I’d come check yours out. We actually have a friend living with us temporarily who is moving back to Minneapolis from Kansas City after the New Year. She is currently questioning her decision after this weekend you all just had up there! ;) Your soup looks perfect for a cold snowy weekend!

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Chef Dennis December 13, 2010 at 8:50 pm

I just came over from Rebecca’s site, and I am so glad that I did! Your soup looks amazing….the recipe make me almost think of a rice custard…what a wonderful filling, hear warming soup it must be!!
Cheers
Dennis

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Raina December 13, 2010 at 9:09 pm

Hi! Saw your post on Chow and Chatter. Love this soup. It looks comforting and delicious. I saw on the news that Minnesota got lots of snow; you sure did! I love the snow. I live in the Boston area, and my kids and I are hoping for some soon:)

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Nicole Franzen December 16, 2010 at 3:01 pm

so much snow! must eat soup :) hehe im in the same boat!

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Magic of Spice December 17, 2010 at 1:41 am

Wow that much snow it amazing to me…I can not even imagine.
I really love Moroccan spices and flavors, so I am sure I would adore this soup. Looks wonderful :)
Hope you are managing to stay warm!

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glenys May 1, 2011 at 11:04 pm

Thanks for the recipe – I will make your soup – I will report back once tasted.

I just had to say how do you live in a climate such as yours? It must be so difficult to lead a normal everyday lofe.

I live In Victoria on the east coast of Australia – our winters are very mild – it does snow in the mountains here, but certainly not in the suburbs.

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Angharad May 2, 2011 at 2:43 pm

Hi Glenya, thanks for the comment! The one and only way to put up with a harsh winter is to be able to enjoy beautiful springs, summers, and autumns – which we usually get here! Hope you enjoy the soup!

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